This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Access to Information request 'Slum Settlements in Kampala'.

FOREWORD 
This Slum Settlement Profile comes at an opportune time – a time when the city of Kampala 
is experiencing unprecedented growth in the history of Uganda. This growth and expansion 
is visible through the mushrooming of informal settlements across the different divisions of 
Kampala, especially in the low-lying areas of the city.  
This expansion has definitely exerted enormous pressure on land, with the poor occupying 
open  spaces  and  the  rich  pushing  the  poor  out  of  settlements  for  commercial  and  more 
formalised  developments.  The  urban  infrastructure  (services  and  utilities)  has  not  been 
spared  as  many  residents  demand  for  better  quality  water,  sewer/  sanitation  facilities, 
electricity, roads, security, and proper solid waste management systems.  
While the city still grapples with serving the existing communities, there are thousands that 
are  flocking  to  the  city  in  search  of  employment  opportunities  and  better  services.  The 
invisible challenge for both the city and the communities has been lack of data/ information 
concerning the informal settlements, leading to a very wide gap between the plans and the 
priorities for the slum residents.  
The  variables  looked  at  in  this  Slum  Profile  include,  among  other  factors,  Security  of 
Tenure,  Housing,  Water  and  Sanitation,  Economic  Activities,  Accessibility,  Drainage, 
and Solid Waste Management
. Perhaps, the most outstanding and profound aspect is that 
this  Slum  Profile  is  not  a  collection  of  information  from  lawyers,  teachers,  doctors,  or 
academicians, but rather ideas from the real slum dwellers who interface with the day-to-
day challenges of slum life.  
 
 
KAMPALA PROFILES: MAKINDYE 
Page 1 
 

link to page 1 link to page 3 link to page 5 link to page 6 link to page 7 link to page 8 link to page 10 link to page 10 link to page 11 link to page 12 link to page 13 link to page 13 link to page 14 link to page 15 link to page 16 link to page 17 link to page 17 link to page 19 link to page 21 link to page 23 link to page 25 link to page 27 link to page 29 link to page 30 link to page 33 link to page 35 link to page 37 link to page 39 link to page 41 link to page 42 TABLE OF CONTENTS 
FOREWORD ........................................................................................................................................................ 1 
PROFILE METHODOLOGY ................................................................................................................................ 3 
A. LOCATION AND HISTORY ........................................................................................................................... 5 
B. LAND .............................................................................................................................................................. 6 
C. POPULATION ................................................................................................................................................. 7 
D. HOUSING ....................................................................................................................................................... 8 
E. SERVICES AND INFRASTRUCTURE ............................................................................................................ 10 
1. Water ........................................................................................................................................................ 10 
2. Sanitation ................................................................................................................................................. 11 
3. Garbage Collection ................................................................................................................................. 12 
4. Electricity .................................................................................................................................................. 13 
5. Transportation ......................................................................................................................................... 13 
6. Education ................................................................................................................................................. 14 
7. Health Care .............................................................................................................................................. 15 
F. LIVELIHOODS, EMPLOYMENT AND ECONOMIC ACTIVITY ................................................................... 16 
SETTLEMENT PROFILES: MAKINDYE ............................................................................................................. 17 
BUKASA ........................................................................................................................................................ 17 
GGABA .......................................................................................................................................................... 19 
KABALAGALA KATABA................................................................................................................................ 21 
KABALAGALA KIKUBAMUTWE................................................................................................................... 23 
KANSANGA .................................................................................................................................................. 25 
KATWE I ........................................................................................................................................................ 27 
KATWE II ....................................................................................................................................................... 29 
KIBUYE I ........................................................................................................................................................ 31 
KIBUYE II ....................................................................................................................................................... 33 
KISUGU ......................................................................................................................................................... 35 
Lukuli Kilombe ................................................................................................. Error! Bookmark not defined. 
NSAMBYA – GOGONYA ............................................................................................................................. 37 
NSAMBYA – KEVINA ................................................................................................................................... 39 
SALAAMA ..................................................................................................................................................... 41 
WABIGALO ................................................................................................................................................... 43 
KAMPALA PROFILES: MAKINDYE 
Page 2 
 

 
PROFILE METHODOLOGY 
The  information  was  collected  through  Focus  Group  Discussions,  informal  meetings  and 
discussion as well as field observations. 
Below is an outline of the General Steps Used in the Data Collection exercise 
1. Meeting with the settlement leaders: 
  To introduce the activity of Slum Settlement Profiling and the motives of carrying it 
out 
  To  identify  and  document  the  community  challenges  and  opportunities  from  the 
leaders’ point of view and general understanding of life in the settlement 
  To get an understanding the leadership structures and stakeholder mapping of the 
settlement 
  Identifying a team to work with the federation (and or network or settlement saving 
group); comprising community members & representatives of the leadership of the 
settlement 
2. Training: 
The settlement team (constituted above) is trained in the different methodologies of data 
collection 
The  team  is  oriented  on  how  to  how  to  approach  respondents  and  ask  questions.  The 
expectations for each question in the questionnaire are explained to the members.  
This training is done primarily by their peers from other settlements especially those who 
have prior engaged in a similar exercise. 
3. Data Collection: 
The profiling team members engage the leaders of the settlement as well as residents in a 
process of identifying the boundaries of their settlement – showing key roads, service points 
and landmarks among other things 
The  team  carries  out  Transect  Walks  around  the  settlement  while  observing  and  taking 
note of the situation 
KAMPALA PROFILES: MAKINDYE 
Page 3 
 

Aided by the questionnaire (see Appendix for a sample), the profiling team conduct a Focus 
Group Discussion
 aimed at collecting those aspects about the slum. While one member of 
the team engages the group in a discussion, the others are recording.  
For  more  specific  information,  Key  Informant  Interviews  with  selected  respondents  are 
organized. 
All the aforementioned steps are guided by the insights and thoughts of the residents of a 
settlement.  The  purpose  of  this  is  that  the  body  of  information  generated  in  the  process 
shall  be  an  accurate  representation  of the  realities  there;  and  in  turn  inform  strategies  to 
address challenges that exist therein. 
4. Feedback and Sharing 
A feedback session is organized in the settlement and the facts about the current situation 
of the settlement collected are shared with all stakeholders of the settlement. From this 
feedback session, discussions are held to forge a way forward on how to address the 
settlements’ most pressing needs.  
Important to note that the Population figures in this report are estimates given by the 
local  leaders  of  the  settlement  based  on  service  provision  exercises  that  involved 
counting  number  of  households  in  their  settlements  for  instance;  distribution  of 
mosquito nets, vaccination among others.  

 
KAMPALA PROFILES: MAKINDYE 
Page 4 
 


MAKINDYE 
A. LOCATION AND HISTORY 
Makindye  division  is  the  southern  part  of  the  city  of  Kampala;  and  is  one  of  the  five 
Divisions  that  make  up  Kampala  City.  Administratively,  the  division  is  made  of  21 
parishes – in which there are 15 of informal settlements. 
The  slum  settlements  in  this  part  of  Kampala  are;  Bukasa,  Ggaba,  Kabalagala-Kataba, 
Kabalagala-Kikubamutwe, Kansanga, Katwe I, Katwe II, Kibuye I, Kibuye II, Kisugu, Lukuli Kilombe, 
Nsambya - Gogonya, Nsambya - Kevina, Salaama and Wabigalo 
The earliest  settlement  is said to have been established  as early as  the  1890  while the 
most recent was first settled in 1997. 
As  a  result  of  their  location,  residents  of  the slums  in Makindye  must  cope  with  natural 
location  hazards  like;  floods,  garbage  dumps,  busy  roads,  power  lines,  open  drains,  and 
industrial hazards. These areas are also prone to man-made disasters like; forced evictions, 
crime, community violence and riots

 
 
KAMPALA PROFILES: MAKINDYE 
Page 5 
 


B. LAND 
Land in Uganda is held under four forms of tenure namely; Mailo, Customary, Freehold and 
Leasehold tenure systems. 
Majority of the land on which the slum settlements in Makindye sit is owned by the Church 
(36%)  and  Private  owners  (27.3%
MAKINDYE: SLUM COVERAGE 
under  Freehold  tenure,  however 
Buganda  Kingdom  also  owns  a 
considerable  portion  (29%)  under 
the  Mailo  tenure.  The  rest  of  it  is 
9% 
owned  by  the  Makindye  Municipal 
council. 
Non-Slum Areas
There are existing threats of eviction 
91% 
Slum Area
in as many as 14 slums in Makindye 
Division;  and  only  2  of  the 
settlements 
namely; 
Nsambya-
Gogonya and Kabalagala-Kataba are 
not  facing  any  form  of  eviction 
threat.  It  should  be  noted  the  level 
of threat varies from settlement to settlement. 
Makindye division’s geographical extent occupies 14,489 acres of land. As shown in the pie 
chart above, the slum settlements occupy only 1,287.9 acres which accounts for  a miserly 
9% of the area. This small section of the division’s land is also the most densely populated. 
 
 
 
KAMPALA PROFILES: MAKINDYE 
Page 6 
 

C. POPULATION 
There are approximately 409,500 people in the informal settlements of Makindye division. 
The  table  below  illustrates  the  different  demographic  aspects  like;  the  number  of 
households, household size and total population per settlement in Makindye. The average 
household size of the slums in the division ranges between 4 and 6 people per household. 
SETTLEMENT NAME 
Households  Household Size 
Total Population 
BUKASA 
5000 

25,000 
GGABA 
3400 

17,000 
KABALAGALA-KATABA 
7000 

38,000 
KABALAGALA-KIKUBAMUTWE 
5000 

30,000 
KANSANGA 
5000 

20,000 
KATWE I 
5000 

25,000 
KATWE II 
7000 

42,000 
KIBUYE I 
6000 

24,000 
KIBUYE II 
4000 

25,000 
KISUGU 
4700 

23,500 
NSAMBYA-GOGONYA 
8000 

32,000 
NSAMBYA-KEVINA 
10000 

50,000 
SALAAMA 
9000 

22,000 
WABIGALO 
9000 

36,000 
TOTAL 
88,100 
  
409,500 
 
 
 
KAMPALA PROFILES: MAKINDYE 
Page 7 
 



D. HOUSING  
Access  to  housing/shelter  is  a  basic  human  right.  Even  though  the  government  has  an 
obligation to house its citizens, this has not been the case and as a result, there has been a 
local  intervention.  Residents,  in  their  means,  have  been  able  to  provide  for  the  housing 
need. 
The  most  common  type  of  house  for  the  people  living  in  the  slum  areas  of  Makindye 
division is the tenement (locally known as mizigo). This is a multi-unit structure with three or 
more housing units that are either one- or two-roomed. The existence of tenements, which 
are  usually  crowded  together,  is  a  sign  of  both  high  population  and  housing  density 
whereby as a large number of people live on a small piece of land. 
 
 
Housing structures everywhere serve a wide range of purposes and meet a variety of ends, 
and are therefore used for different uses. The most common ones in the case of the slums 
in  Makindye  are;  Residential  use,  Commercial  (Business)  use,  Mixed  use  and  other  uses. 
Housing structures that are used only as abodes are categorised as residential, while those 
where people reside as well conduct business are referred to as mixed use. There are also 
those whose sole use is commercial (business) use, for example supermarkets, shops, and 
kiosks.  In  addition,  schools,  clinics,  health  centres,  and  water  kiosks,  among  others,  are 
categorised as others
Structure Use 
Residential 
Mixed Use 
Business 
Other 
Total 
No. of Structures 
28,730 
13,520 
4,250  
1,066 
47,566 
KAMPALA PROFILES: MAKINDYE 
Page 8 
 


In  total,  the  informal  settlements  in  Makindye  contain  approximately  18,150  housing 
structures.  The  graph  below  illustrates  how  the  structures  are  being  used  in  Makindye 
Division.  From  the  graph,  it  is  evident  that  majority  (60%)  of  the  structures  serve  purely 
residential purposes. 
HOUSING STRUCTURE USE: MAKINDYE SLUMS 
2% 
9% 
Residentials Only
29% 
(Mixed) Residential &
Business
60% 
Business only
Other structures
 
 
 
 
 
KAMPALA PROFILES: MAKINDYE 
Page 9 
 


E. SERVICES AND INFRASTRUCTURE 
To sustain life in  any  settlement, there are  certain basic  services  infrastructure needs that 
must be in place; these include among other things; Water, Sanitation facilities, Solid Waste 
Management (Garbage collection), Electricity, Transportation, Education and Health services. 
1. Water 
That  water  is  life  is  an  indisputable  reality,  even  in  the  slum  areas  of  Makindye.  Water  is 
used domestically for cooking and washing, but it also serves industrial purposes where it is 
a key raw material in the small scale business that are undertaken by the slum dwellers 
The major sources of water for the residents of the slums in Makindye are the water taps (or 
stand  pipes)  –  these  are 
either  Individual  taps  or 
Community 
taps. 
The 
former  are  those  owned 
and  used  by  a  single 
household  while  the  latter 
maybe  owned  by  an 
individual  but  are  used  by 
the 
wider 
community. 
There’s  a  fee  attached  to 
water  collected  from  the 
taps. In most settlements of 
Makindye, 

20-litre 
jerrican  of  water  costs 
between UGX 100 and UGX 
200.  However,  the  average 
monthly household expenditure for water is about UGX 27,000. 
Wells and springs are the other water sources for slum dwellers; of which each settlement 
has at least one. Because they are a free source, wells and springs are popular among the 
poorest of the poor, and in times of water shortage. It should be noted water from all of the 
aforementioned water sources is not safe in that it has to be boiled prior to consumption. 
 
 
 
KAMPALA PROFILES: MAKINDYE 
Page 10 
 



2. Sanitation 
Sanitation facilities are indispensable in any settlement, and as such are one of the 
basic  services  to  which  each  settlement  must  have  access.  Inadequate  sanitation 
facilities expose the residents to the risk of deadly diseases like; Cholera, Dysentery, 
and Typhoid, among others. 
The sanitation facilities available in  all the settlements in  Makindye  division can be 
categorised  as;  Individual  Toilets,  Shared  Toilets,  Communal  Toilets  and  Public 
Toilets. The categorisation is based on access and ownership. 
 
 
Individual  Toilets  are  those  which  are  owned  and  accessible  by  individual 
households;  Shared  Toilets,  on  the  other  hand,  are  those  which  are  accessible  by 
households living in houses built by a single individual. In most cases, the number of 
seats on such toilets depends on the number of households. 
Communal Toilets are those put up and managed by members of a given community 
to address the sanitation needs, and are accessible by all members of the public at a 
fee  per  visit.  However,  the  residents,  in  some  cases,  pay  a  standard  fee  monthly.  
Public Toilets are built and managed by the local authority (Makindye urban council 
or Kampala Capital City Authority). 
The table below shows the total number of the functioning (working) toilet facilities 
in the slums of Makindye division - all these are pit latrines. 
Working toilets: 
Type of Toilet 
Individual  Shared 
Communal 
Public 
Total 
Toilets 
Toilets 
Toilets 
Toilets 
No. of Toilets 
291  
10 
5  
19 
325 
 
KAMPALA PROFILES: MAKINDYE 
Page 11 
 



In 8 settlements, there are pay-per use toilets where residents pay between UGX 150 
and  UGX  300  per  visit.  Of  all  the  slum  settlements  in  Makindye,  only  one  has  a 
connection to the main sewer line; the rest use pit latrines. 
Residents of the informal settlements of  Makindye division reported that  there are 
also  unconventional  and  unhealthy  sanitation  practices  such  as;  open  defecation 
(30%)  and  the  bucket system  (often  referred  to  as  the  flying  toilet)  -  20.6%.  These 
have come about as a result of an acute lack of adequate sanitation facilities. 
3. Garbage Collection 
Even though Garbage collection is a core service that should be functioning well at 
settlement  level,  it  has  turned  out  to  be  a  major  challenge  which  residents,  city 
authorities, and leaders are all grappling. A number of factors combine to make the 
already bad situation worse. 
Firstly,  in  the  informal  settlements  of  Makindye  division,  there  are  no  designated 
communal garbage collection points, and this is compounded by the fact that land 
owners  have  been  unwilling  to  give  away  a  portion  of  their  land  for  this  purpose, 
citing poor maintenance of the sites. 
 
 
The collection point for most of the garbage generated from the settlements is the 
individual household bin. 
Residents in all the 15 slum settlements reported that KCCA is doing a commendable 
job in  ensuring that  the garbage generated at  household level is  collected at  least 
weekly. On average, the garbage is collected  once a week from the settlements by 
the trucks from KCCA. However, some residents reported that there are times when 
the collection truck never comes the whole week.  
However,  a  lot  more  needs  to  be  done  by  the  residents  together  with  the  city 
authorities  and  the  local  leaders  because  garbage  that  has  been  dumped  is  still  a 
sore sight in many of the slums in Makindye Division and Kampala in general. 
KAMPALA PROFILES: MAKINDYE 
Page 12 
 


Much  as  garbage  collection  is  a  service  provided  by  the  city  authority,  KCCA; 
residents  in  8  settlements  reported  paying  for  garbage  collection  each  time  of 
collection. The payments are made at an average rate of UGX 6,962 per month. 
4. Electricity 
Electricity  is  one  of  the  key  services  that  are  vital  for  the  proper  and  effective 
functioning  of  any  settlement.  All  of  the  informal  settlements  in  Makindye  have 
access to electricity, however not all households have direct access. The households 
do not have electricity because they find the tariffs too high for them to afford while 
others have alternative sources of energy. 
On  average,  each  household  spends  approximately  UGX  37,000  monthly  on 
electricity  –  a  tariff  residents  decried  as  being  high  for  them.  As  a  result,  some 
families  have  resorted  to  illegal  connections,  and  others  have  no  power  in  their 
houses. 
Important  to note  is  the  fact  that  Electricity  serves  community  functions  like  street 
lighting  which  enable  movement  at  night  and  enhance  security.  Of  the  15 
settlements in Makindye, only 3 are serviced with street lights.  
Electricity is essential because it is used for lighting and running domestic appliances 
like television sets. The business enterprises in the settlements also use electricity for; 
refrigerating  drinks  for  sale,  running  salon  equipment,  dry  cleaners,  among  others. 
Therefore, an outage of electricity greatly cripples activity in the area 
5. Transportation 
Due to the fact that Makindye division is mostly residential, most of the commercial 
functions  and  other  works  are  performed  out  of  the  division.  This  necessitates 
commuting to the city centre. 
KAMPALA PROFILES: MAKINDYE 
Page 13 
 


In Makindye, most residents commute to the city centre by way of taxis (Omnibus, 
motorcycles (bodaboda) and  bicycles.  On average,  the cost of Taxi, Motorcycle and 
Bicycle to the city centre from Makindye is UGX 2000, UGX 3000 and UGX 1500. 
6. Education 
Like  most  Ugandans,  residents  of  Makindye  have  access  to  education  facilities 
through  government  programmes  such  as  UPE    and  USE  ,  aimed  at  providing 
primary and secondary school education, respectively, for all. 
As a result, Nursery (pre-school), Primary and Secondary schools can all be accessed 
from within the settlement. However, most of these facilities are owned and run by 
private individuals, with the Government providing the supervisory role through the 
Ministry of Education and Sports. 
 
The  outstanding  challenge  identified  by  the  residents  with  respect  to  education  in 
the slums is that it is expensive, as a majority of the schools are privately owned and 
not subsidised by the aforementioned government programmes. It is against such a 
background  that  residents  in  all  the  settlements  reported  the  need  for  more  and 
more affordable schools. 
 
 
KAMPALA PROFILES: MAKINDYE 
Page 14 
 

7. Health Care 
All of the informal settlements in Makindye have access to a variety of health services 
and  facilities,  where  residents  can  receive  medical  attention.  Most  of  these  are 
located  within  the  settlements,  and  in  only  one  settlement  is  the  health  centre 
located outside. The facilities include general health clinics, drug shops, pharmacies, 
and  maternal  homes,  to  mention  but  a  few.  All  medical  care  is  free  in  the 
government health facilities; however individuals have to pay if they opt to use the 
private health facilities.   
Residents  in  all  the  slum  settlements  of  Makindye  reported  having  access  to  both 
health centres and hospital, however in only 8 out of the informal settlements can an 
AIDS clinic be found; and only 2 contain a hospital.  
It  should  be  noted  that  Malaria  is  the  most  common  disease  affecting  the  slum 
dwellers  of  Makindye,  other  common  diseases  include;  Cough  and  Flu,  HIV/AIDs, 
Diarrhoea, Measles and Cholera.  
Common 
Common 
Common 
Common 
SETTLEMENT NAME 
disease 1 
disease 2 
disease 3 
disease 4 
BUKASA 
Malaria 
Cholera 
Skin Disease 
Eye Disease 
GGABA 
Malaria 
Cholera 
Typhoid 
HIV/AIDS 
KABALAGALA-KATABA 
Malaria 
HIV/AIDS 
Tuberculosis 
Cholera 
KABALAGALA-KIKUBAMUTWE 
Malaria 
HIV/AIDS 
Flu 
Cough 
KANSANGA 
Malaria 
HIV/AIDS 
FLUE 
Cholera 
KATWE I 
Malaria 
Diarrhea 
Cholera 
Kwashiokor 
KATWE II 
Malaria 
Flu 
HIV/AIDS 
Tuberculosis 
KIBUYE I 
Malaria 
Tuberculosis 
Cholera 
HIV/AIDS 
KIBUYE II 
Malaria 
Typhoid 
Flu 
  
KISUGU 
Malaria 
Cough 
Ring Worms 
Cholera 
LUKULI KILOMBE 
Diarrhea 
Cough 
Malaria 
HIV/AIDS 
NSAMBYA - GOGONYA 
Malaria 
HIV/AIDS 
Typhoid  
 
NSAMBYA - KEVINA 
Malaria 
HIV/AIDS 
Typhoid 
Measles 
SALAAMA 
Malaria 
HIV/AIDS 
FLUE 
Cholera 
WABIGALO 
Malaria 
Cough 
Typhoid 
Diarrhea 
  
 
KAMPALA PROFILES: MAKINDYE 
Page 15 
 



F. LIVELIHOODS, EMPLOYMENT AND ECONOMIC ACTIVITY  
Understanding  the  livelihood  situation  and  the  employment  opportunities  available  in  a 
given settlement is very important. This gives one an idea about the affordability levels for 
various goods and services, as well as appropriate interventions that can work to improve 
lives in general. 
 
 
 
One of the main reasons why people migrate to cities is the pursuit for better opportunities 
to earn a living by participating in the different activities that take place there among which 
is  trade.  It  is,  therefore,  very  imperative  to  have  a  closer  look  at  the  employment 
opportunities  and  those  activities  that  support  and  maintain  livelihoods  in  the  informal 
settlements.  These  include;  General  shops  (Groceries),  Food  shops  (restaurants),  Auto 
repairs (garages), and Furniture shops. 
In Makindye, slum dwellers have access to informal markets where they can buy food and 
other necessities, but also earn a living by selling their commodities there. There are other 
avenues  like  shops,  which  provide  the  service  and  opportunity  mentioned  above  to  the 
slum dwellers of Makindye Division. 
The table below is an illustration of the types of shops and their quantity in the informal 
settlements of Makindye. 
Type of 
General Shops 
Food 
Clothing 
Auto Repair 
Furniture 
Shop 
(Groceries) 
(Restaurants) 
(Garages) 
No. of 
11,958 
2,403  
1,127  
150  
328 
Shops 
KAMPALA PROFILES: MAKINDYE 
Page 16 
 



SETTLEMENT PROFILES: MAKINDYE 
I. BUKASA 
 
Background 
Bukasa was founded in 1890. It is located near Katongole Stage and Bukasa stone quarry. The name 
comes from the ghost that did not allow people to grown beans on the land. 
 
KAMPALA PROFILES: MAKINDYE 
Page 17 
 

Land 
Bukasa is approximately 72.4 acres in size. Land ownership in this settlement is divided between 
private individuals and Buganda Kingdom as shown in the table below. There have been 3 eviction 
threats. There is currently a high level eviction threat.  
Land Owner 
Municipality 
Private 
Crown 
Church 
Customary 
Percentage 
 
50% 
50% 
 
 
 
Population 
There are 5,000 households in Bukasa, with an average size of 5. The total population is 25,000. 
Housing 
There are 2,000 structures in Bukasa. 
Structure Use 
Residential 
Mixed-use 
Business 
Other 
Total 
No. of Structures 
1,000 
750  
200 
50 
2,000 
 
Community Development Priorities 

Sanitation and sewage 

Toilets 

Education facilities 

Roads 

Flooding 
 
 
 
KAMPALA PROFILES: MAKINDYE 
Page 18 
 



II. GGABA 
Background 
Gaba Mission was founded in 1940. It is located near Hared Petrol Station on Ggaba Road. 
The name comes from the practice of free giving. 
 
KAMPALA PROFILES: MAKINDYE 
Page 19 
 

Land 
Gaba Mission covers approximately 20 acres of land. Land tenure is divided between 
municipal, private, crown and church. There have been 2 eviction threats. There is currently 
a low level eviction threat. 
Land Owner 
Municipality 
Private 
Crown 
Church 
Customary 
Percentage owned  
20% 
20% 
40% 
20% 

 
Population 
There are 10,000 households in Ggaba, with an average size of 5. The total population is 
50,000. 
Housing  
There are 3,730 structures in Ggaba. 
Structure 
Residential 
Mixed-use 
Business 
Other 
Total 
No. of Structure 
3,000  
400 
300 
30 
3,730 
 
Community Development Priorities 

Water drainage 

Sanitation and sewage 

Universities 

Mosquito spray 

 
 
 
 
KAMPALA PROFILES: MAKINDYE 
Page 20 
 



III. KABALAGALA KATABA 
 
Background 
Kataba – Buyinja was founded in 1986. It is located near Shell Kabalagala and Buyinja Zone. The 
name comes from the Luganda words for swamp and small stone. 
 
KAMPALA PROFILES: MAKINDYE 
Page 21 
 

Land 
Kataba-Buyinja extends to cover approximately 56.8 acres of land. Land is owned by multiple 
stakeholders and the table below shows that clearly. There has been 1 eviction threat. There is 
currently no eviction threat. 
Land Owner 
Municipality 
Private 
Crown 
Church 
Customary 
Percentage 
 
30% 
 
25% 
45% 
 
Population 
There are 7,000 households in Kataba-Buyinja, with an average size of 5. The total population is 
38,000. 
Housing 
There are 5,300 structures in Kataba – Buyinja. 
Structure 
Residential 
Mixed-use 
Business 
Other 
Total 
No. of Structure 
3,500  
1,500  
200 
100 
5,300 
 
Community Development Priorities 

Education (sensitization) 

Garbage collection 

Water and drainage 

Land tenure 

Sanitation and sewage 
 
 
 
KAMPALA PROFILES: MAKINDYE 
Page 22 
 



IV. KABALAGALA KIKUBAMUTWE 
 
Background 
Kikubamutwe was founded in 1950. It is located near Shell Kabalagala and Capital Pub. The name 
(Kabalagala) comes from a businessman who used to make pancakes. 
KAMPALA PROFILES: MAKINDYE 
Page 23 
 

Land 
The  land  size  of  Kikubamutwe  is  approximately  52.3  acres  of  land.  There  are  different 
categories of people who own the land of the settlement, and the table below shows the 
details.  In  the  past,  there  has  been  1  eviction  threat,  and  currently  there’s  a  high  level 
eviction threat.  
Land Owner 
Municipality 
Private 
Crown 
Church 
Customary 
Percentage 
 
40% 
 
35% 
25% 
 
Population 
There  are  5000  households  in  Kikubamutwe,  with  an  average  size  of  6  people  per 
household. The total population is 30,000 people.  
Housing 
There are 2,050 structures in Kikubamutwe. 
Structure 
Residential 
Mixed-use 
Business 
Other 
Total 
No. of Structure 
800 
800 
400 
50 
2,050 
 
Community Development Priorities 

Sanitation and sewage 

Sensitization 

Health services 

Water 

Education facilities 
 
 
 
KAMPALA PROFILES: MAKINDYE 
Page 24 
 


V. KANSANGA 
Background 

Kansanga was founded in 1990. It is located near Kampala International University and Kansanga 
Miracle Centre. The origin of the settlement name is unknown to the residents 
 
Land 
Kansanga slum expands to cover a total of approximately 146 acres of land. The details of 
the tenure of the settlement are in the table below. There has been a single eviction threats. 
There is currently a low level eviction threat. 
Land Owner  Municipality 
Private 
Crown 
Church 
Customary 
Percentage 
30% 
50% 
15% 
5% 
 
 
 
 
 
KAMPALA PROFILES: MAKINDYE 
Page 25 
 

Population 
There are 5,000 households in Kansanga, with an average size of 4 people per household. 
The total population of the settlement is 20,000 people. 
Housing 
There are 2,500 structures in Kansanga. 
Structure 
Residential 
Mixed-use 
Business 
Other 
Total 
No. of Structure 
1,500  
500 
300 
200 
2,500 
 
Community Development Priorities 

Sanitation and sewage 

Water drainage 

Security 

Roads 

N/A 
 
 
 
KAMPALA PROFILES: MAKINDYE 
Page 26 
 



VI. KATWE I 
Background 
Katwe I was founded in 1986. It is located near the Pedestrian flyover on Entebbe Road. The name is 
a depiction of the mental talents of workers from the settlement. This area is full of artisans and 
metal fabricators. 
 
KAMPALA PROFILES: MAKINDYE 
Page 27 
 

Land 
Katwe I covers a total area of approximately 70.9 acres of land. Land tenure is divided between 
private and crown. There has been 1 eviction threat. There is currently a low level eviction threat.  
Land Owner 
Municipality 
Private 
Crown 
Church 
Customary 
Percentage 
80% 
20% 
 
 
 
 
Population 
There are 5,000 households in Katwe I, with an average size of 5. The total population is 25,000. 
Housing 
There are 1,030 structures in Katwe I. 
Residential 
Mixed-use 
Business 
Other 
Permanent 
Temporary 
230 
670 
100 
30 
850 
180 
 
schools, primary schools and secondary schools. 
 
Community Development Priorities 

Water drainage 

Sanitation and sewage 

Security 

Education 

Diseases 
 
 
 
KAMPALA PROFILES: MAKINDYE 
Page 28 
 



VII. KATWE II 
 
Background 
Katwe II was founded in 1986. It is located near the railway line, the clock tower and Queen’s Way 
flyover.  The name comes from the metal fabricators who used their heads to work. 
 
KAMPALA PROFILES: MAKINDYE 
Page 29 
 

Land 
Katwe II covers an area of approximately 86.5 acres of land. The table below shows the 
tenure status of the land in the settlement. There have been 2 eviction threats. There is 
currently a high level eviction threat largely because there are some people who have 
settled in the railway reserve. 
Land Owner  Municipality 
Private 
Crown 
Church 
Customary 
Percentage 
 
 
30% 
60% 
10%  
 
Population 
There are 70,000 households in Katwe II, with an average size of 6. The total population of 
the settlement is 42,000 people. 
Housing 
There are 3,550 structures in Katwe II. 
Structure 
Residential  Mixed-use  Business  Other 
Total 
No. of Structure 
1,500  
2,000 

50 
3,550 
 
Community Development Priorities 

Land tenure 

Electricity 

Sanitation and sewage 

Water drainage 

Health centres 
 
 
 
KAMPALA PROFILES: MAKINDYE 
Page 30 
 



VIII. KIBUYE I 
 
Background 
Kibuye I was founded in 1986. The settlement is along the railway line and has as one of its 
landmarks Katwe Police Station. The origin of the name is not clear. 
 
KAMPALA PROFILES: MAKINDYE 
Page 31 
 

Land 
Kibuye I covers an area of approximately 93.4 acres of land. The table below shows the 
tenure status of the settlement land. There have been 2 eviction threats. There is currently a 
high level eviction threat. 
Land Owner 
Municipality 
Private 
Crown 
Church 
Customary 
Percentage 
 
60% 
20% 
20% 
 
 
Population 
There are 6,000 households in Kibuye I, with an average size of 4. The total population is 
24,000 people. 
Housing 
There are 1,920 structures in Kibuye I. 
Structure 
Residential 
Mixed-use 
Business 
Other 
Total 
No. of Structure 
1,000  
400 
500 
20 
1,920 
 
Community Development Priorities 

Health centres 

Government schools 

Sanitation and sewage 

Water drainage 

N/A 
 
 
 
 
KAMPALA PROFILES: MAKINDYE 
Page 32 
 


IX. KIBUYE II 
Background 

Kibuye II was founded in 1986. It is located near Makindye Barracks and Kategula. The name comes 
from a man who used to live in the settlement. 
 
Land 
Kibuye II covers a total area of approximately 180 acres of land. The Land tenure status of 
the settlement is shown in the table below. There has been 1 eviction threat. There is 
currently a high level eviction threat. 
Land Owner  Municipality 
Private 
Crown 
Church 
Customary 
Percentage 
 
60% 
 
20% 
20% 
 
 
 
KAMPALA PROFILES: MAKINDYE 
Page 33 
 

Population 
There are 40,000 households in Kibuye II, with an average size of 6. The total population is 
25,000. 
Housing 
There are 4,800 structures in Kibuye II. 
Structure 
Residential 
Mixed-use 
Business 
Other 
Total 
No. of Structure 
3,000  
1,500 
250 
50 
4,800 
 
Community Development Priorities 

Sanitation and sewage 

Water drainage 

Water 

Health centres 

Security 
 
 
 
 
KAMPALA PROFILES: MAKINDYE 
Page 34 
 



X. KISUGU 
 
Background 
Kisugu was founded in 1920. It is located near International Hospital Kampala. The name comes 
from Amusigukuludde which a Luganda word which means exhumed or unburied or revealed from 
the ground.  
 
KAMPALA PROFILES: MAKINDYE 
Page 35 
 

Land 
Kisugu’s area is approximately 85.6 acres of land. The Land tenure of the settlement is shown in the 
table below. There has been 1 eviction threat. There is currently a low level eviction threat. 
Land Owner 
Municipality 
Private 
Crown 
Church 
Customary 
Percentage 
30% 
70% 
 
 
 
 
Population 
There are 4,700 households in Kisugu, with an average size of 5. The total population is 23,500. 
Housing 
There are 1,616 structures in Kisugu. 
Structure 
Residential 
Mixed-use 
Business 
Other 
Total 
No. of Structure 
1,000  
450 
100 
66 
1,616 
 
Community Development Priorities  

Water drainage 

Sanitation and sewage 

Schools 

Mosquito nets 

Health service 
 
 
 
KAMPALA PROFILES: MAKINDYE 
Page 36 
 



XI. NSAMBYA – GOGONYA 
 
Background 
Established in 1945, Nsambya-Gogonya is located near St. Peter’s Parish Nsambya. The name, 
Gogonya was derived from the name of a man who once lived in the settlement. 
 
KAMPALA PROFILES: MAKINDYE 
Page 37 
 

Land 
Nsambya-Gogonya informal settlement covers an area which is approximately 90.7 acres of land. 
This settlement is on land which belongs to the Church. There has been 1 eviction threat in the past; 
however, there is currently no eviction threat. 
Land Owner 
Municipality 
Private 
Crown 
Church 
Customary 
Percentage 
 
 
 
100% 
 
 
Housing 
There are 5,000 structures in Nsambya – Gogonya. 
Residential 
Mixed-use 
Business 
Other 
Permanent 
Temporary 
2,300 
1,500 
900 
100 
4,500 
500 
 
Community Development Priorities  

Health centres 

Education 

Sanitation and sewage 

Water drainage 

Women’s groups 
 
 
 
KAMPALA PROFILES: MAKINDYE 
Page 38 
 


XII. NSAMBYA-KEVINA 
Background 

Nsambya-Kevina was founded in 1920. It is located next to St. Francis Hospital, Nsambya, and the 
Kevina Stage of Nsambya. The name comes from the many trees that covered the land. 
 
Land 
Nsambya-Kevina covers a total area of 112 acres of land all of which are owned by the Church. The 
residents who live here have lease agreement with the church. There have been 2 eviction threats. 
There is currently a high level eviction threat. 
Land Owner 
Municipality 
Private 
Crown 
Church 
Customary 
Percentage 
 
 
 
100% 
 
 
 
 
KAMPALA PROFILES: MAKINDYE 
Page 39 
 

Population 
There are 10,000 households in Nsambya-Kevina, with an average size of 5. The total population is 
50,000 people. 
Housing 
There are 5,500 structures in Nsambya-Kevina and as the table below shows, these housing 
structures serve different functions. 
Structure 
Residential 
Mixed-use 
Business 
Other 
Total 
No. of Structure 
3,000 
2,000  
400 
100 
5,500 
 
Community Development Priorities 
 

Health centres 

Water drainage 

Mosquito nets 

Sanitation and sewage 

N/A 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
KAMPALA PROFILES: MAKINDYE 
Page 40 
 



XIII. SALAAMA 
 
Background 
Salaama was founded in 1920. It is located near Salaama Road. The name comes from the 
words Lala Salaama, meaning good night. 
 
KAMPALA PROFILES: MAKINDYE 
Page 41 
 

Land 
Salaama covers a total area of approximately 39.3 acres of land. Land tenure is divided 
between private and crown. There have been no eviction threats in the past; however there 
is currently a low level eviction threat.  
Land Owner  Municipality 
Private 
Crown 
Church 
Customary 
Percentage 
 
40% 
60% 
 
 
 
Population 
There are 9,000 households in Salaama, with an average size of 6. The total population is 
54,000. 
Housing 
There are 4,000 structures in Salaama. 
Structure 
Residential  Mixed-use  Business  Other 
Total 
No. of Structure 
3,000  
500 
400  
100 
4,000 
 
Community Development Priorities 

Education 

Security 

Sanitation and sewage 

Water drainage 

Land tenure 
 
 
 
KAMPALA PROFILES: MAKINDYE 
Page 42 
 



XIV. WABIGALO 
 
Background 
Wabigalo was founded in 1970. It is located near Muwaire Road, Green Hill Academy and Monitor 
Publications. The name comes from the use of hand scaling. 
 
KAMPALA PROFILES: MAKINDYE 
Page 43 
 

Land 
Wabigalo slum covers an area which is approximately 41.9 acres of land majority of which is owned 
by private individuals while the rest is owned by the Church as shown in the table below. There have 
been 2 eviction threats. There is currently a high level eviction threat. 
Land Owner 
Municipality 
Private 
Crown 
Church 
Customary 
Percentage 
 
60% 
 
40% 
 
 
Population 
There are 9,000 households in Wabigalo, with an average size of 4. The total population is 36,000 
people. 
Housing 
There are 3,200 structures in Wabigalo. 
Structure 
Residential 
Mixed-use 
Business 
Other 
Total 
No. of Structure 
2,500  
500 
150 
50 
3,200 
 
Community Development Priorities 

Sanitation and sewage 

Water drainage 

Mosquito nets 

Formal market 

N/A 
 
 
KAMPALA PROFILES: MAKINDYE 
Page 44 
 

Document Outline